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Nov. 13, 2018 by Robin Kundis Craig

Does the President Really Matter to U.S. Participation in International Law? A View from the Perspective of Oceans Law

This post is part of a series of essays from the Environmental Law Collaborative on the theme "Environmental Law. Disrupted." It was originally published on Environmental Law Prof Blog.

How much do presidents really matter to the United States' participation in international environmental law?

Fairly obviously, presidential turnovers in the United States are absolutely critical to how the United States conducts its international relations. President George W. Bush's pursuit of Middle Eastern terrorists in the wake of 9/11, including wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, represents a far different engagement with the rest of the world regarding international terrorism than President Obama's reliance on drones and attempts to bring American troops back home. In turn, President Obama's engagement with the rest of the world on climate change, including committing the United States to the Paris Accord, represents a radically different path than the one President Trump has thus far chosen to walk with regard to the same issue. Indeed, President Trump's "America First" approach to international relations shows every sign of becoming one of the most presidentially driven idiosyncratic periods in the United States' relations with the rest of the world since at least the conclusion of World War …

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Nov. 13, 2018

Does the President Really Matter to U.S. Participation in International Law? A View from the Perspective of Oceans Law